Resources

One thing that all techies  and worship leaders can use is resources. Some of these resources will be over your head, some will be seemingly beneath you. I purposefully put a variety of complexity among these resources so that they would provide something for everyone. I will split  up the external resources (links) based on my assessment of their accessibility and mark them based on the type of resource (e.g. forum, how-to article, etc.). One or two of them will be in multiple positions because they have materials that are appropriate for multiple skill levels. Of course, I use these categories loosely, because many people who come to this site and use these will likely be either in the “beginner” area or between the “intermediate” and “advanced” areas.

I cannot explicitly vouch for all materials within all of these resources, but I have reviewed enough to be fairly confident that they contain good information. Use your judgment for each site to avoid any possible bad materials, especially as the forums will be a mixture of opinions — experienced and inexperienced, biased and unbiased, by-the-book and school of hard knocks. In general, however, these sources should be largely trustworthy.

Beginner:

Recording Studio Central http://www.recordingstudiocentral.com/index.html — This is the new home for those from the Studio-Central community. Here you can find a group of people who do all kinds of recording, both in small studios and large studios. DIY guides, hardware songwriting, questions, mastering–you name it, they’ve got it. It was started up only recently (today is July 1, 2013), so it is not as populated with materials as is the Studio-Central forums. Here is where you will want to post your new questions, however, as Studio-Central is no longer moderated because of spam.

Studio-Central http://www.studio-central.com/phpbb/index.php — This is the old home for those now in the Recording Studio Central community. Until recently (spring of 2013), it was quite the hotspot. It moved, however, because of the vast amount of spamming that was happening. It is still a good place to dig through to see if there is an answer to your current question, though you are unlikely to get much response for new threads. It covers just about everything you could want in home studio questions.

Tweak’s Guide http://tweakheadz.com/guide-to-home-and-project-music-studios/ — This is a guide built for those interested in anything recording. It is not a forum, but it was built with beginners in mind so they would have a solid go-to website for all their music tech knowledge needs. He has a special guide for beginners, called “For Noobs” on the left-hand side, a bit toward the bottom of the page. His site is connected to his job, so there are a lot of ads for the musical items and programs that you may or may not need, but the material is good enough to account for the marketing.

Intermediate:

Home Studio Corner http://www.homestudiocorner.com/ — This site is run by Joe Gilder, a recording engineer from the Nashville area. He runs several sound training groups and utilizes videos, articles, and private forums for his members. The content available to the public tends to be shorter rather than longer, but it still includes a lot of good snippets of advice.

How Music Really Workshttp://www.howmusicreallyworks.com/ — A book written by Wayne Chase, it explains a lot about music theory in layman’s terms. The first six chapters are available on the web site. I am including links for all six chapter indexes directly (see the book summary here) because of the somewhat confusing site layout: Intro, Ch 1, Ch 2, Ch 3, Ch 4, Ch 5, Ch 6.

RaneNote (Gain Structure) http://www.rane.com/note135.html — I found this article through a forum discussion of proper gain structure technique. I have not yet read all of it, but they seem to give a balanced perspective on how far to take one source’s word for it, emphasizing the use of principles over opinion. Some of the discussion will be confusing and wordy to those new to the world of engineering, but they still provide ample definitions and explanations, making the material more accessible to the reader. As I said, I have not yet read all of it, but what I have read seems to be solid advice (I will confirm this in the near future).

Recording Studio Central http://www.recordingstudiocentral.com/index.htm — This is the new home for those from the Studio-Central community. Here you can find a group of people who do all kinds of recording, both in small studios and large studios. DIY guides, hardware songwriting, questions, mastering–you name it, they’ve got it. It was started up only recently (today is July 1, 2013), so it is not as populated with materials as is the Studio-Central forums. Here is where you will want to post your new questions, however, as Studio-Central is no longer moderated because of spam.

Studio-Central http://www.studio-central.com/phpbb/index.php — This is the old home for those now in the Recording Studio Central community. Until recently (spring of 2013), it was quite the hotspot. It moved, however, because of the vast amount of spamming that was happening. It is still a good place to dig through to see if there is an answer to your current question, though you are unlikely to get much response for new threads. It covers just about everything you could want in home studio questions.

Tweak’s Guide http://tweakheadz.com/guide-to-home-and-project-music-studios/ — This is a guide built for those interested in anything recording. It is not a forum, but it was built with beginners in mind so they would have a solid go-to website for all their music tech knowledge needs. He has a special guide for beginners, called “For Noobs” on the left-hand side, a bit toward the bottom of the page. His site is connected to his job, so there are a lot of ads for the musical items and programs that you may or may not need, but the material is good enough to account for the marketing.

Advanced:

How Music Really Workshttp://www.howmusicreallyworks.com/ — A book written by Wayne Chase, it explains a lot about music theory in layman’s terms. The first six chapters are available on the web site. I am including links for all six chapter indexes directly (see the book summary here) because of the somewhat confusing site layout: Intro, Ch 1, Ch 2, Ch 3, Ch 4, Ch 5, Ch 6.

Studio-Central http://www.studio-central.com/phpbb/index.php — This is the old home for those now in the Recording Studio Central community. Until recently (spring of 2013), it was quite the hotspot. It moved, however, because of the vast amount of spamming that was happening. It is still a good place to dig through to see if there is an answer to your current question, though you are unlikely to get much response for new threads. It covers just about everything you could want in home studio questions.

RaneNote (Gain Structure) http://www.rane.com/note135.html — I found this article through a forum discussion of proper gain structure technique. I have not yet read all of it, but they seem to give a balanced perspective on how far to take one source’s word for it, emphasizing the use of principles over opinion. Some of the discussion will be confusing and wordy to those new to the world of engineering, but they still provide ample definitions and explanations, making the material more accessible to the reader. As I said, I have not yet read all of it, but what I have read seems to be solid advice (I will confirm this in the near future).

Recording Studio Central http://www.recordingstudiocentral.com/index.html — This is the new home for those from the Studio-Central community. Here you can find a group of people who do all kinds of recording, both in small studios and large studios. DIY guides, hardware songwriting, questions, mastering–you name it, they’ve got it. It was started up only recently (today is July 1, 2013), so it is not as populated with materials as is the Studio-Central forums. Here is where you will want to post your new questions, however, as Studio-Central is no longer moderated because of spam.

Downloads:

Chords On The Scale (Major) — Chords Of The Scale – Major — Two-page handout showing diatonic (not borrowed) chord qualities for all major keys (Shortlink: http://wp.me/a3iTGx-bh).

Cymbal Swell Sampleshttp://www.homestudiocorner.com/percussion/ — Short article on the use of percussion in tracks.

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